Workshop on the Languages of Papua 4   |  WLP Home  
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Programme

 Monday, 23 January
0800 - 0850 registration
0850 - 0900 opening
 Session 1: Typology
0900 - 0930do' and 'give': Macrofunctionality in the Cenderawasih Bay area
David Gil
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany
0930 - 1000Same, identical, or equal? Idematives in languages of New Guinea
René van den Berg
Summer Institute of Linguistics, Ukarumpa, Papua New Guinea
1000 - 1030 refreshments
 Session 2: Phylogeny
1030 - 1100Can ecological models predict the diversity and distribution of languages?
Russell Gray
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany
1100 - 1130A combined comparative and phylogenetic analysis of the Bosavi and East Strickland languages
Bethwyn Evans* and Simon Greenhill°
*Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, °Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany
1130 - 1200Object prefixing verbal subclass as a diagnostic of TNG affiliation
Glenn Windschuttel
University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia
1200 - 1330 lunch
 Session 3: Languages of Tanah Papua
1330 - 1400Object marking in Yali
Sonja Riesberg
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia / Universität Koln, Cologne, Germany
1400 - 1430Traditional political system as sociolinguistic aspect in forming Sentani language variation
Andreas J. Deda
Universitas Papua, Manokwari, Indonesia
1430 - 1500A typological overview of Dèm, an isolate of the West Papuan highlands
Bill Palmer
University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia
1500 - 1530 refreshments
 Session 4: Languages of Wallacea
1530 - 1600An initial look at Manirem, also known as Betaf (bfe) and Vitou (vto)
Kavon Hooshiar
University of Hawai'I at Manoa, Honolulu HI, USA
1600 - 1630The structures of two nominal possessive constructions in Pagu
Dalan M. Peranginangin
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
1630 - 1700First findings on Kalamang: The case of lost grammatical markers
Eline Visser
Lund University, Lund, Sweden
 Tuesday, 24 January
 Session 5: Languages of Papua New Guinea
0900 - 0930From subordinate clause to attributive clause in Sirva
Don Daniels
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
0930 - 1000Children's language learning, multilingualism and school language policy in a PNG Highlands community
Alan Rumsey
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
1000 - 1030 refreshments
 Session 6: Languages of Southern New Guinea 1
1030 - 1100The Yelmek-Maklew family  A picture of (un)expected diversity
Tina Gregor
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
1100 - 1130The sociolinguistics of word initial /h/ lenition in Namboland, Papua New Guinea
Eri Kashima
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
1130 - 1200Grammaticalisation in a multilingual matrix: the decopulative prominence marker in Nen and Nmbo
Nick Evans, Eri Kashima and Mark Ellison
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
1200 - 1330 lunch
 Session 7: Languages of Southern New Guinea 2
1330 - 1400Reconstructing the phonology of Proto-Yam
Nick Evans*, Matthew J. Carroll* and Christian Döhler°
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
1400 - 1430Prenasalised voiceless stops in Ngkolmpu
Matthew J. Carroll
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
1430 - 1500Associated motion in Sibidiri Idi (Pahoturi River family, Southern PNG)
Volker Gast
Universität Jena, Jena, Germany
1500 - 1530 refreshments
 Session 8: Languages of Southern New Guinea 3
1530 - 1600On the history of Marind verb stems
Bruno Olsson* and Timothy Usher°
*Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, °Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe NM, USA
1600 - 1630The ethnobotanical-linguistic documentation of Sago: a preliminary report from Merauke
La Hisa, Agus Mahuze and I Wayan Arka
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
1630 - 1700Agreement theory, number features and inclusory plural in Marori
I Wayan Arka
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
1700 - 1730 refreshments
 Special Public Lecture
1730 - 1830Languages, Music, Maps: Borders in the New Guinea Region
Don Niles
Institute of Papua New Guinea Studies, Boroko, Papua New Guinea
 Wednesday, 25 January
 Session 9: South Halmahera West New Guinea Languages 1
0900 - 0930Noun classification in three languages of Raja Ampat
Laura Arnold
University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
0930 - 1000eeeH
Laura Arnold* and David Gil°
*University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, °Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany
1000 - 1030 refreshments
 Session 10: South Halmahera West New Guinea Languages 2
1030 - 1100Inclusory pronominals and agreement marking in Wooi
Yusuf Sawaki
Universitas Papua, Manokwari, Indonesia
1100 - 1130Wooi prosody: Some observations
Nikolaus Himmelmann
Universität Koln, Cologne, Germany
1130 - 1200Creating language support materials in the undergraduate classroom
Emily Gasser
Swarthmore College, Swarthmore PA, USA
1200 - 1330 lunch
 Session 11: Austronesian Languages of Wallacea
1330 - 1400Ambonese Malay is toneless and stressless
Carlos Gussenhoven
Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
1400 - 1430Aspect and directionality in Kupang Malay serial verb constructions
June Jacob* and Charles E. Grimes°
*Artha Wacana Christian University, Kupang, Indonesia, °SIL, Kupang, Indonesia
1430 - 1500Systemic functional linguistic analysis of modality and adjunct in proposing a girl using Waijewa language
Magdalena Ngongo
Artha Wacana Christian University, Kupang, Indonesia
1500 - 1530 refreshments
 Session 12: Austronesian Languages of Papua New Guinea
1530 - 1600La and e: what are their roles in the Maututu dialect of the Nakanai language?
May Huvi
Devare Adventist High School, Autonomous Region of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea
1600 - 1630business meeting

 Thursday, 26 January
 Session 13: Stylized Language
0900 - 0930The significance of parallelism in Kaunjambi, an Awiakay all-night song/dance cycle from the Sepik region of Papua New Guinea
Darja Hoenigman
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
0930 - 1000Incomprehensibility in traditional song texts in the New Guinea area: Towards understanding nonsense
Don Niles
Institute of Papua New Guinea Studies, Boroko, Papua New Guinea
1000 - 1030 refreshments
 Session 14: Timor-Alor-Pantar Languages 1
1030 - 1100The grammaticalization of verbs in Timor, Alor and Pantar
Marian Klamer
Universiteit Leiden, Leiden, The Netherlands
1100 - 1130From words to history in Alor Pantar
Frantiek Kratochvil* and Marian Klamer°
*Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, °Universiteit Leiden, Leiden, The Netherlands
1130 - 1200Abui Verbal Classes  Comparison of clustering approaches
Frantiek Kratochvil*, Benidiktus Delpada*, Olga Zamaraeva° and Emily M. Bender°
*Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, °University of Washington, Seattle WA, USA
1200 - 1330 lunch
 Session 15: Timor-Alor-Pantar Languages 2
1330 - 1400Abui ethnobotany: A preliminary report
Gary Holton, A.L. Blake, and Michael Thomas
University of Hawai'I at Manoa, Honolulu HI, USA
1400 - 1430Lexical and grammatical tone in Abui (Timor-Alor-Pantar)
Benidiktus Delpada and Frantiek Kratochvil
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
1430 - 1500Coming of age: diagnosing contact-induced change in Abui-Malay bilinguals
George Saad
Universiteit Leiden, Leiden, The Netherlands
1500 - 1530 refreshments
 Session 16: Papuan Malay
1530 - 1600Language ideological brokers: Raising the value of Papuan Malay
Izak Morin
La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
1600 - 1630Why do you clap so sparsely?  Single handclaps in Papuan Malay
Angela Kluge
SIL, Germany
1630 - 1700The patient/object argument in passive constructions in Papuan Malay: its structural, semantic and pragmatic properties
Yusuf Sawaki, Sara Karubaba and Jeanette Lekeneny
Universitas Papua, Manokwari, Indonesia
1700 - 1710 closing

Page location: http://wlp.shh.mpg.de/4/programme.html
Page last modified: 18 Jan 2017, Melbourne